neurosciencestuff:

Bioengineer Studying How the Brain Controls Movement
A University of California, San Diego research team led by bioengineer Gert Cauwenberghs is working to understand how the brain circuitry controls how we move. The goal is to develop new technologies to help patients with Parkinson’s disease and other debilitating medical conditions navigate the world on their own. Their research is funded by the National Science Foundation’s Emerging Frontiers of Research and Innovation program.
"Parkinson’s disease is not just about one location in the brain that’s impaired. It’s the whole body. We look at the problems in a very holistic way, combine science and clinical aspects with engineering approaches for technology," explains Cauwenberghs, a professor at the Jacobs School of Engineering and co-director of the Institute for Neural Computation at UC San Diego. "We’re using advanced technology, but in a means that is more proactive in helping the brain to get around some of its problems—in this case, Parkinson’s disease—by working with the brain’s natural plasticity, in wiring connections between neurons in different ways."
Outcomes of this research are contributing to the system-level understanding of human-machine interactions, and motor learning and control in real world environments for humans, and are leading to the development of a new generation of wireless brain and body activity sensors and adaptive prosthetics devices. Besides advancing our knowledge of human-machine interactions and stimulating the engineering of new brain/body sensors and actuators, the work is directly influencing diverse areas in which humans are coupled with machines. These include brain-machine interfaces and telemanipulation.

neurosciencestuff:

Bioengineer Studying How the Brain Controls Movement

A University of California, San Diego research team led by bioengineer Gert Cauwenberghs is working to understand how the brain circuitry controls how we move. The goal is to develop new technologies to help patients with Parkinson’s disease and other debilitating medical conditions navigate the world on their own. Their research is funded by the National Science Foundation’s Emerging Frontiers of Research and Innovation program.

"Parkinson’s disease is not just about one location in the brain that’s impaired. It’s the whole body. We look at the problems in a very holistic way, combine science and clinical aspects with engineering approaches for technology," explains Cauwenberghs, a professor at the Jacobs School of Engineering and co-director of the Institute for Neural Computation at UC San Diego. "We’re using advanced technology, but in a means that is more proactive in helping the brain to get around some of its problems—in this case, Parkinson’s disease—by working with the brain’s natural plasticity, in wiring connections between neurons in different ways."

Outcomes of this research are contributing to the system-level understanding of human-machine interactions, and motor learning and control in real world environments for humans, and are leading to the development of a new generation of wireless brain and body activity sensors and adaptive prosthetics devices. Besides advancing our knowledge of human-machine interactions and stimulating the engineering of new brain/body sensors and actuators, the work is directly influencing diverse areas in which humans are coupled with machines. These include brain-machine interfaces and telemanipulation.

24 Apr 14 @ 10:02 am  —  via + org  —  reblog
proofmathisbeautiful:

OPTICS
Via: Parachutes and PolicyMic

proofmathisbeautiful:

OPTICS

Via: Parachutes and PolicyMic

24 Apr 14 @ 8:02 am  —  via + org  —  reblog

naive-bayesian:

4K composites from the Solar Dynamics Observatory

24 Apr 14 @ 6:03 am  —  via + org  —  reblog
❝ Everything we call real is made of things that cannot be regarded as real. If quantum mechanics hasn’t profoundly shocked you, you haven’t understood it yet.
— Niels Bohr
24 Apr 14 @ 4:01 am  —  via + org  —  reblog
astrodidact:

Want to build your own space agency? Well, now you can, because NASA’s about to give away a whole bunch of their code for free! You’ll have access to the coding behind robots, cryogenic systems and climate simulators. There’s even code for running rocket guidance systems.
Read more: http://wrd.cm/1i5Q3H9 via Wired, Science Alert/fb
Image: NASA

astrodidact:

Want to build your own space agency? Well, now you can, because NASA’s about to give away a whole bunch of their code for free! You’ll have access to the coding behind robots, cryogenic systems and climate simulators. There’s even code for running rocket guidance systems.

Read more: http://wrd.cm/1i5Q3H9 via Wired, Science Alert/fb

Image: NASA

24 Apr 14 @ 2:03 am  —  via + org  —  reblog
kenobi-wan-obi:

Cider May Be Healthier Than Clear Apple Juice


  Clear apple juice may be prettier, but cloudy apple juice is probably better for your health. A new study shows that cloudy juice can contain more than five times as much of a health-linked antioxidant as clear juice has.
  
  The color of most apples, other fruits, and vegetables comes from a family of antioxidants called polyphenols. Studies have associated these chemicals with health benefits ranging from a reduced risk of cancer to improved brain functions.
  
  Generally, the stronger the color of the fruit is, the higher the concentration of polyphenols will be. The skin and seeds of an apple are particularly high in these compounds, and the process of making clear apple juice removes this solid matter.
  
  "It is better if you eat whole apples than juices. But for juices, it’s better if you drink this cloudy juice," says the new study’s lead author Jan Oszmianski, who studies fruit and vegetable processing at the Agricultural University of Wroclaw in Poland.
  
  While scientists had widely assumed that cloudy juice (cider) ought to be more healthful, Oszmianski’s study provides a more accurate picture of the difference in antioxidant activity between these two juice types. That’s because the most common way to measure this activity requires a transparent sample. In other words, it only works well with clear juice.
  
  Oszmianski and his colleagues employed a technique called electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR), which can measure the activity of antioxidants in both cloudy and clear juice. The method even accounts for polyphenols bound to solid bits of pulp, which include an especially potent class of polyphenols called procyanidins.
  
  "This is the first time that I’ve seen [anyone] use [EPR] to measure antioxidant activity in plant extracts," says Joshua Lambert, assistant professor of chemical biology at Rutgers University in Piscataway, N.J., who was not involved in the study.
  
  Oszmianski’s team found that procyanidins were between 2.6 and 5.3 times as abundant in cloudy juice as in clear, depending on the variety of apple used. However, amounts of other antioxidants were more nearly equal between the two kinds of juice. Overall, the cloudy juice was 1.5 to 1.8 times as effective an antioxidant as the clear juice. Oszmianski and his colleagues report their results in an upcoming Journal of the Science of Food and Agriculture.

kenobi-wan-obi:

Cider May Be Healthier Than Clear Apple Juice

Clear apple juice may be prettier, but cloudy apple juice is probably better for your health. A new study shows that cloudy juice can contain more than five times as much of a health-linked antioxidant as clear juice has.

The color of most apples, other fruits, and vegetables comes from a family of antioxidants called polyphenols. Studies have associated these chemicals with health benefits ranging from a reduced risk of cancer to improved brain functions.

Generally, the stronger the color of the fruit is, the higher the concentration of polyphenols will be. The skin and seeds of an apple are particularly high in these compounds, and the process of making clear apple juice removes this solid matter.

"It is better if you eat whole apples than juices. But for juices, it’s better if you drink this cloudy juice," says the new study’s lead author Jan Oszmianski, who studies fruit and vegetable processing at the Agricultural University of Wroclaw in Poland.

While scientists had widely assumed that cloudy juice (cider) ought to be more healthful, Oszmianski’s study provides a more accurate picture of the difference in antioxidant activity between these two juice types. That’s because the most common way to measure this activity requires a transparent sample. In other words, it only works well with clear juice.

Oszmianski and his colleagues employed a technique called electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR), which can measure the activity of antioxidants in both cloudy and clear juice. The method even accounts for polyphenols bound to solid bits of pulp, which include an especially potent class of polyphenols called procyanidins.

"This is the first time that I’ve seen [anyone] use [EPR] to measure antioxidant activity in plant extracts," says Joshua Lambert, assistant professor of chemical biology at Rutgers University in Piscataway, N.J., who was not involved in the study.

Oszmianski’s team found that procyanidins were between 2.6 and 5.3 times as abundant in cloudy juice as in clear, depending on the variety of apple used. However, amounts of other antioxidants were more nearly equal between the two kinds of juice. Overall, the cloudy juice was 1.5 to 1.8 times as effective an antioxidant as the clear juice. Oszmianski and his colleagues report their results in an upcoming Journal of the Science of Food and Agriculture.

23 Apr 14 @ 10:02 am  —  via + org  —  reblog
asapscience:

via ScienceAlert, Beatrice the Biologist

asapscience:

via ScienceAlertBeatrice the Biologist

23 Apr 14 @ 8:02 am  —  via + org  —  reblog
thecraftychemist:

Laplace rail

2 magnets disk on a axle4.5 Volts 2Amp2 aluminum bands on plastic

The Laplace rail is a good demonstration of the ‘right hand curl rule’

Using a hand as a guide If we have a current moving in the direction of the thumb, the magnetic field will be oriented in the direction of the curled fingers
When the current is applied the only way for the circuit to be completed is through the axle. Given the red terminal is positive the current is moving from left to right through the axle generating a circular magnetic field that is oriented towards the viewer.
The magnets on each end of the axle are now repelled by the field generated by the current and force the axle to move. If you were to switch the terminals the axle would move towards the viewer - this is demonstrated in the later half of the video which can be found here.

thecraftychemist:

Laplace rail

2 magnets disk on a axle
4.5 Volts 2Amp
2 aluminum bands on plastic

The Laplace rail is a good demonstration of the ‘right hand curl rule

Using a hand as a guide If we have a current moving in the direction of the thumb, the magnetic field will be oriented in the direction of the curled fingers

When the current is applied the only way for the circuit to be completed is through the axle. Given the red terminal is positive the current is moving from left to right through the axle generating a circular magnetic field that is oriented towards the viewer.

The magnets on each end of the axle are now repelled by the field generated by the current and force the axle to move. If you were to switch the terminals the axle would move towards the viewer - this is demonstrated in the later half of the video which can be found here.

23 Apr 14 @ 6:03 am  —  via + org  —  reblog
rtamerica:

Scientists develop ‘self-healing’ muscles
Scientists at Duke University announced they have developed living muscle tissue that can heal itself in an animal just as natural tissue would, raising hopes that more research will lead to self-healing muscles to help humans recover from injuries.
Biomedical engineers discovered that the test skeletal muscle developed at the Durham, North Carolina school was able to integrate into lab mice quickly, and then heal itself quickly once inside the animal. They also measured the muscle’s strength by shocking it with electric pulses, discovering it was more than 10 times stronger than any previously engineered muscles, according to Quartz.
Lead researcher Nenad Bursac told the site that perhaps the most exciting development was that they were able to isolate stem cells from mouse muscle and then grow them into muscle fibers.

rtamerica:

Scientists develop ‘self-healing’ muscles

Scientists at Duke University announced they have developed living muscle tissue that can heal itself in an animal just as natural tissue would, raising hopes that more research will lead to self-healing muscles to help humans recover from injuries.

Biomedical engineers discovered that the test skeletal muscle developed at the Durham, North Carolina school was able to integrate into lab mice quickly, and then heal itself quickly once inside the animal. They also measured the muscle’s strength by shocking it with electric pulses, discovering it was more than 10 times stronger than any previously engineered muscles, according to Quartz.

Lead researcher Nenad Bursac told the site that perhaps the most exciting development was that they were able to isolate stem cells from mouse muscle and then grow them into muscle fibers.

23 Apr 14 @ 4:01 am  —  via + org  —  reblog
23 Apr 14 @ 2:02 am  —  via + org  —  reblog
OS